I Still Have Pain After My Spine Surgery: Now What?

Great advances have been made in spinal surgery in the last couple decades, to the point where a good number of surgeries are now considered to be minimally invasive. This means your body experiences less trauma, which makes for a quicker recovery.

Unfortunately, whether you undergo minimally invasive surgery for your back issues, which doesn’t require any cutting of muscles and results in less bleeding, or a more complex procedure, you may still experience pain. This might feel frustrating because the goal of your surgery was to relieve or eliminate pain.

As a board-certified neurosurgeon and experienced spine surgeon, Dr. Benjamin Cohen always takes an individualized approach to your pain. Once he makes a diagnosis, his first approach is always the least invasive. There are times, however, when surgery can’t be avoided. 

Rest assured that Dr. Cohen is committed to you for the long-term, and he and our caring team assist you expertly from presurgery to postsurgery and beyond.

Why am I experiencing pain after my spinal surgery? I thought this would solve it!

Unfortunately, the 6-12-week period following spinal surgery can typically be accompanied by a high level of pain. When Dr. Cohen performs any type of spinal surgery, he monitors you very closely during the most intense part of it — typically the first three days postsurgery.

What can be done to mitigate pain after spine surgery?

One of the many types of treatment Dr. Cohen offers patients is surgery. Whether he performs spinal fracture surgery to treat an injury, surgery to treat an existing condition, revision (corrective) surgery, or another type, he:

Depending on when you’re ready, Dr. Cohen might also prescribe some physical therapy to promote your healing and lessen your pain. 

Dr. Cohen also emphasizes the importance of getting adequate rest, and he knows that high-quality rest can only happen when your pain is properly managed. 

Your role in healing from back surgery

You already know that spine surgery is a big deal, and Dr. Cohen and our team sympathize with the fact that you may be impatient to get back to normal life. It’s important, though, for you to give yourself adequate time and emotional space to heal.

The most important things you can do to aid your healing and lessen your pain include:

Healing from spine surgery is incremental and doesn’t happen overnight, so try not to get too discouraged by postsurgical pain. It’s normal, treatable, and doesn’t last forever. Most importantly, Dr. Cohen and our team are here to help you take it one day at a time.

Learn more about spine surgery and recovery

Chances are you’ll feel much more at ease if you talk through your questions about your spine surgery with Dr. Cohen. Call our office at 516-231-2849 to make an appointment so you can begin devising a plan for healing together. 

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